Features

The 5 Things Jamaicans Can Learn From Tessanne Chin Winning "The Voice"

Written by Xavier Murphy

As Jamaicans worldwide celebrate Tessanne Chin’s impressive win of the NBC show “The Voice” there are some valuable lessons to be learned. Here are 5 things we learned from Tessanne Chin’s winning “The Voice”.

1.The Jamaican Diaspora Is Powerful
To many the Jamaican Diaspora is seen only as an “open wallet and purse”. They are the number one source for foreign exchange to Jamaica and they send back “barrels”. They voted and influence others to vote for Tessaane Chin. They organized to help a fellow Jamaican like never before. The power of the Jamaican Diaspora is undervalued and needs to be harnessed to influce NOW!!!

2. Jamaicans Can Unite
Jamaicans at home and abroad were united with one goal in mind. There was no JLP or PNP. There was no uptown or downtown. We were truly “Out of many one people” united for a cause.

3. Jamaicans Can Start A Movement
Jamaicans can affect change when united. Not since the push to elect Barack Obama have we seen a movement this large in Jamaicans worldwide. Under the banner hash tag #teamtessanne (Team Tessanne) Jamaicans worldwide started a movement. Imagine how powerful this type of movement could be to affect change in other areas.

4. Don’t Reject Advice & Be Humble
Shaggy suggested to Tessanne to tryout for “The Voice”. She could have rejected the advice being she was establishing herself in Jamaica. She took a risk. She listened to Shaggy’s valuable advice. We as Jamaicans sometimes can be too prideful when it comes to advice. Tessanne has been described by everyone as being humble through out the competition. She listened to her coach, Adam, and constantly thanked him for suggestions. The biggest sign of her humility is her willingness to always take advice. Are you open to taking advice?

5. Be A Proud Jamaican
You don’t have to change who you are to have success overseas. You can be Jamaican and be successful anywhere in the world. Tessanne did not try to hide her Jamaican accent by “twanging”. She mentioned “Bread and Buttah” which is a part of the Jamaican culture. She also never gave up on her roots as she performed a few reggae songs. She was a proud Jamaican that represented us well.

About the author

Xavier Murphy