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Jamaica’s Fiftieth Anniversary: Prominent Physicians

This article has special meaning for me because as a child growing up in Jamaica I was plagued with childhood illnesses that very few Doctors had remedies for, however, there was one Physician, Dr. John Martin, who left an indelible memory in my mind. His professionalism and capacity to be a genuine, caring, healer spoke volumes throughout my life and the lives of many other Jamaicans.

In his practice, he incorporated Medical Science along with Natural Medicine, his spirituality gave him impeccable insight into his patients’ souls therefore healing them miraculously. He never kept his patients waiting and never thought himself too bourgeoisie to tend to lowly persons. For him, it was the joy of healing that made him very successful and God rewarded him accordingly.
 
We currently live in a world where Physicians have been consumed with “Big Business” and rarely care about the patients they treat. Medicine has become “all about the money”.
 
In my research to write this article, I came across the names of some notable Doctors who are advancing the world and making great strides within the Medical Community. Here are a few of Jamaica’s Prominent Physicians:
 
Dr. Clayton Sewell, Forensic Psychiatrist of The University of The West Indies (UWI). He is the President ofthe Jamaica Psychiatric Association. Affiliated with Medical Associates, Tangerine Place, Jamaica, West Indies.
 
Forensic Psychiatrists work with the courts in order to determine competency to stand trial. They usually specialize in two areas of criminal evaluation, competency to stand trial (CST), and mental state at the time of offense (MSO). They are called upon as expert witnesses in both criminal and civil cases. Dr. Sewell believes that 1 in every 100 Jamaican is schizophrenic and, there isn’t enough being done about the mentally ill in Jamaica.
 
Dr. Michael Boyne, Endocrinologist, Senior Lecturer in Endocrinology
 
Dr. Michael Tulloch-Reid, Endocrinologist
 
Dr. Rosemarie Wright-Pascoe, Endocrinologist, President of the Caribbean Endocrinology Society
 
Endocrinologists are Doctors who treat diseases associated with hormone producing glands.
 
Dr. Ladi Doonquah, DDS (Dentist), Founding Doctor of Facial and Oral Surgery Associates, specializing in maxillofacial surgery, plastic surgery and oral surgery. He has been practicing for 14 years and has offices located in Kingston, Jamaica and Georgia, USA.
 
Dr. Althea Dawn Cecelia East Innis, Department of Medicine, Bach. of Medicine & Surgery, UWI, Mona, Jamaica, Diploma from Soc. of Apothecaries, Diploma of Dermatology, University of London. Noted for research pertaining to the outcome of fungal, hair and scalp infections, as well as skin disorders.
 
Dr. Eva Lewis Fuller, MBBS, MPh, Member of the Medical Council, Medical Officer of the Ministry of Health. Consultant for Jamaica Health & Lifestyle Research Group Surveys.
 
Dr. Amza Ali, Trained in Medicine at the University of The West Indies. Studied Neurology at the National Hospital for Neurology, Queen Square, London. Former Head of Medicine at Kingston Public Hospital. Founding and current President of  Jamaica League Against Epilepsy (JLAE). Affiliated with Epilepsy Centre of Jamaica and Andrews Memorial hospital. Noted for research pertaining to retroviral neurology, parkinsons and other neurological disorders. He has received several prestigious awards for his work caring for persons with epilepsy. 
 
Dr. Minerva Thame, Prominent Researcher (Nine Publications), Senior Lecturer in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology & Child Health, UWI. Consultant Pediatrician at University Hospital, Mona, Jamaica.
 
Dr. Kevin Harvey, Executive Director of the National HIV/ST1 Program at the Ministry of Health. Awarded prestigious Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship to study HIV/Aids Policy and Prevention in the United States at Emory University. He is known for his dedication regarding the fight against HIV/Aids. Recipient of Fulbright Scholarship, which was only awarded to 10 Jamaicans.
 
Dr. Marion Bullock-Ducasse, Hurricane Disaster Management and Crisis Intervention. Member of the National Road and Safety Council of Jamaica, consultant regarding the reduction of accidents on Jamaican roads and highways. Authority on Swine Flu and H1N1 Vaccines.
 
Dr. Anusha Campbell Chambers, Trained at the University of The West Indies, Jamaica and St. John’s Institute of Dermatology at Guys’ and St. Thomas hospital, Kings College, London. Specializes in laser treatments, chemical peels, microdermabrasion and botox. She is an International Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. She has two offices in Kingston and one in Montego Bay.
 
Dr. Winston De La Haye, Consultant Psychiatrist, Lecturer at the University of The West Indies, Director of Detoxification Unit at UWI. Associated with the University of Technology, Jamaica. He believes that marijuana could be the major cause of crime and violence in society, suggesting that it has the ability to make a person crazy because it contains  tetrahydro cannabinol which increases aggressive behaviour. Dr. De La Haye believes that there is an increasing problem of mental illness in Jamaica, with illnesses ranging from depression to personality disorders.
 
Dr. Michael Tulloch-Reid, MBBS, FCCP, Consultant Pulmonologist & Intensivist at the Heart Institute of the Caribbean. He is a graduate of UWI. Completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Metropolitan Hospital, New York Medical College. Fellowships in Critical Care Medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Pulmonology at Lenox Hill Hospital, New York. He is also trained in International Pulmonology at Lahey Clinic and Temple University. Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonology and Critical Care.
 
Although Jamaica is a Third World country, it has its share of brilliant, innovative Doctors who are on the cutting edge of science. However, while I was researching this article, I found it quite difficult to locate Jamaican Physicians with ease. It made me wonder if the island’s physicians are in hiding due to the rapidly increasing drug problem?
 
Our Society has become so depraved that even the people whom God has blessed to help and heal, are resorted to keeping a low profile in order to preserve their practices and livelihoods.
 
 

 

About the author

Margaret J.Bailey