Jamaican News & Announcements

Top 7 Jamaican & Caribbean News Stories You Missed The Week Ending February 23rd, 2018

weekly news stories you missed this week
Written by Staff Writer

THIS WEEK’S TOP JAMAICAN NEWS STORIES

NATURALLY FLOWING OIL FOUND ONSHORE IN JAMAICA FOR FIRST TIME
For the first time in history, oil was found to be flowing naturally onshore in Jamaica in two locations. This could be just the beginning for oil exploration in the region, according to the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica and CGG GeoConsulting. Jamaica is considered to be “frontier territory,” although Tullow Oil, a British company, has been conducting operations there since 2014. The discovery marks the first documented occurrence of “live” oil from onshore Jamaica and will create increased interest in oil exploration focusing on the Caribbean and Central America, said the two Caribbean oil firms in a joint statement. Tullow said that oil and natural gas were found in ten of 11 onshore and offshore wells drilled in Jamaica since 2014.

EDUCATION, CULTURE MINISTRIES STAGE JAMAICA DAY 2018
Jamaica’s Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sports has joined with the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information to observe Jamaica Day for 2018. On February 23, 2018, Jamaica Day, under the theme of “Celebrating Jamaica: Nurturing Our Cultural and Natural Heritage,” will be observed at schools throughout the island. Students will engage in various activities meant to highlight Jamaica’s culture and focus on their experience as citizens of the country. The featured school for 2018 is Munro College in St. Elizabeth. At the school, the Ministry of Culture’s Culture Division will promote the Culture Passport program. This program allows students to access heritage sites and cultural institutions like art galleries, museums, theaters, and special performances for free or at a reduced cost.

THIS WEEK’S TOP CARIBBEAN NEWS STORIES

CARIBBEAN ISLANDS DEVASTATED BY STORMS JOIN TO WELCOME BIRDS BACK
The devastating Caribbean hurricanes of 2017 caused enormous damage to the people and natural environment of several islands. Forests, wetlands, and the animals that live there were seriously impacted. In spite of the damage, bird watchers across the region took time out from their rebuilding efforts to consider the plight of migratory and local birds. At events held as part of International Migratory Bird Day sponsored by Environment for the Americas and organized by BirdsCaribbean, experts and students gathered to determine whether Hurricane Maria altered the number and diversity of birds, learned about the value of wild spaces, and studied the importance of stopover sites for migratory birds. Teams of teachers and students from Puerto Rico, Haiti, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic reached out to educate the public about bird migration, provide bird feeders and seed to help the birds find food and engage people of all ages in making their homes favorable to the birds to ensure their recovery and survival.

THIS WEEK’S TOP JAMAICAN DIASPORA NEWS STORIES

QUARTERLY MAGAZINE TARGETS JAMAICAN DIASPORA
The quarterly publication BASHY Magazine is designed to cover Jamaica’s art, style, and culture from the point of view of Millennials. It seeks to amplify the common perceptions of Brand Jamaica, which are focused on promoting Western tourism, and return complexity to the depictions of the island. The founder of BASHY is Sharine Taylor, who is based in Toronto. She plans for the new publication to cover Jamaican culture and its Diaspora with content that comes exclusively from Jamaican writers and creative artists. According to Taylor, “Jamaica is a paradox because it embodies an unruliness, a kind of ‘do whatever’ attitude, but at the same time it holds conservative attitudes.” Taylor is a fourth-year student at the University of Toronto and wants to provide a place to speak about as many parts of the island’s culture as she can.

THIS WEEK’S TOP BUSINESS NEWS STORIES

MINISTRY SEEKS TO MAKE KINGSTON A MUSICAL ECONOMIC ZONE
Jamaica’s Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, is constructing a framework that will allow Kingston to operate as a musical economic zone. Because it has received the UNESCO designation, it is time to transform it into more tangible elements for the people, said Olivia Grange, Portfolio Minister. She believes that reggae is the greatest component of Brand Jamaica and is known around the world. “we are proud to declare that we still own it,” she said. Kingston was one of 47 new places added to the UNESCO Creative Cities Network in December of 2015. Grange wants to see increased promotion of reggae’s anthropological roles in the development of the nation, the transformation of the lives of young people, and the struggle for human rights and freedoms in places like South Africa and Zimbabwe.

THIS WEEK’S TOP ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT NEWS STORIES

POLLS OPEN FOR NOMINATIONS OF ACTS FOR REGGAE INDUSTRY AWARDS
Interested people now have the opportunity to make nominations for Song of the Year and Emerging Artist of the Year awards for the 2018 Jamaica Reggae Industry Association (JaRIA) Honor Awards. Chronixx is a two-time nominee in the category of Song of the Year with Skankin Sweet and Likes. Protoje has also been nominated for Blood Money; Damian Marley for Medication, and Dre Island with We Pray, a collaboration with Popcaan. Nominees for Emerging Artiste of the Year include Koffee, Samory L. Shenseea, and Notis Heavyweight Rockaz. Voting ends at midnight on Friday, February 23, 2018. The award ceremony is slated for Saturday. February 24, in New Kingston.

THIS WEEK’S TOP SPORTS NEWS STORIES

FRASER-PRYCE PROMISES HER COMEBACK TO BE “GREATEST IN HISTORY”
Following a year off from competition due to her pregnancy, Jamaica’s sprint superstar Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is vowing that her return to track and field will be spectacular. Fraser-Pryce gave birth to her son Zyon in August 2017 and is now ready to resume her career in the 2018 season. She made her remarks as a guest speaker in the yearly Howard Arts Memorial Lecture, which is featured ahead of the Gibson McCook Relays. In her speech, Fraser-Pryce said, “My comeback will be the greatest in the sport.”  At 31, Fraser-Pryce is one of the most honored athletes on the global track and field scene. She has won two Olympic and three World Championship 100-meter titles and gold and silver medals in the 200 meters at the World Championships and Olympics, respectively. An injury during the lead-up to the 2016 Olympics caused her to finish third in the 100-meter final. In her speech, she also paid tribute to her coach at the MVP Track Club, Stephen Francis.

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Staff Writer