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Youth from Latin America and the Caribbean Demand a Multi-dimensional Education to Adapt to a Changing Future

Written by Staff Writer

The results of the regional consultation for youth “Tell them what you want to learn” will be delivered to the authorities attending the Regional Ministerial Meeting “E2030: Education and Skills for the 21st Century” to be held on 24 and 25 January 2017 in Buenos Aires. Below are some of its conclusions.

The consultation responds to a pilot initiative that, given its positive evaluation, will be proposed by the UNESCO as a permanent mechanism to work with the countries and the social actors in Latin America and the Caribbean for the period 2017-2030.

An education that enables youth to learn to decipher the coming changes, to be able to adapt to them and acquire the necessary tools to be aware of reality, take part in it and transform it, are some of the main requests identified by more than 60 thousand young people in the 39 Latin American and Caribbean countries that participated in the UNESCO consultation “Tell them what you want to learn.”

Youth concerns were compiled in the first report of the results of this consultation carried out by the Regional Bureau for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean (OREALC/UNESCO Santiago). The report will be delivered to the authorities who will be attending the Regional Meeting of Ministers of Education of Latin America and the Caribbean “E2030: Education and Skills for the 21 Century,” which will be held from 24 to 25 January 2017 in Buenos Aires.

The consultation was designed to collect information on the learning that the regions’ youth need and desire, with the perspective of the new global commitments of the Agenda E2030 that seeks to “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.”

The first report of the results of this UNESCO consultation will be published at the end of January 2017. It reflects the need to rethink educational systems and what happens within them. It also puts in evidence that it is necessary to reinvent traditional teaching and learning methods, given that there is a demand for other ways to acquire knowledge, placing the traditional teaching models within a broad spectrum of ways of accessing, producing, and sharing knowledge.

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Staff Writer