Announcement

Collapse

Boardite Facebook Group


Hi All



For those boardites who are facebook we have a Boardite Facebook Group. Be sure to check it out.
See more
See less

PHOTOS: Robin Thicke’s "Blurred Lines" about RAPE. see powerfull photos of the lyrics

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PHOTOS: Robin Thicke’s "Blurred Lines" about RAPE. see powerfull photos of the lyrics

    Check out the article below with the images. Makes you think of the song "Blurred lines" from another point of view.

    From the Mouths of Rapists: The Lyrics of Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines
    by Sezin Koehler, Sep 17, 2013, at 12:00 pm
    Source: The Society Pages

    Trigger warning: Graphic descriptions of sexual assault.
    Robin Thicke’s summer hit Blurred Lines addresses what he considers to be sounds like a grey area between consensual sex and assault. The images in this post place the song into a real-life context. They are from Project Unbreakable, an online photo essay exhibit, and feature images of women and men holding signs with sentences that their rapist said before, during, or after their assault. Let’s begin.
    I know you want it.
    Thicke sings “I know you want it,” a phrase that many sexual assault survivors report their rapists saying to justify their actions, as demonstrated over and over in the Project Unbreakable testimonials.

    You’re a good girl.
    Thicke further sings “You’re a good girl,” suggesting that a good girl won’t show her reciprocal desire (if it exists). This becomes further proof in his mind that she wants sex: for good girls, silence is consent and “no” really means “yes.”


    Calling an adult a “good girl” in this context resonates with the the virgin/whore dichotomy. The implication in Blurred Lines is that because the woman is not responding to a man’s sexual advances, which of course are irresistible, she’s hiding her true sexual desire under a facade of disinterest. Thicke is singing about forcing a woman to perform both the good girl and bad girl roles in order to satisfy the man’s desires.

    Thicke and company, as all-knowing patriarchs, will give her what he knows she wants (sex), even though she’s not actively consenting, and she may well be rejecting the man outright.

    Do it like it hurt, do it like it hurt, what you don’t like work?
    This lyric suggests that women are supposed to enjoy pain during sex or that pain is part of sex:

    The woman’s desires play no part in this scenario – except insofar as he projects whatever he pleases onto her — another parallel to the act of rape: sexual assault is generally not about sex, but rather about a physical and emotional demonstration of power.
    The way you grab me.
    Must wanna get nasty.
    This is victim-blaming. Everybody knows that if a woman dances with a man it means she wants to sleep with him, right? And if she wears a short skirt or tight dress she’s asking for it, right? And if she even smiles at him it means she wants it, right? Wrong. A dance, an outfit, a smile — sexy or not — does not indicate consent. This idea, though, is pervasive and believed by rapists.


    And women, according to Blurred Lines, want to be treated badly.
    Nothing like your last guy, he too square for you.
    He don’t smack your *** and pull your hair like that.
    In this misogynistic fantasy, a woman doesn’t want a “square” who’ll treat her like a human being and with respect. She would rather be degraded and abused for a man’s gratification and amusement, like the women who dance around half naked humping dead animals in the music video.

    The pièce de résistance of the non-censored version of Blurred Lines is this lyric:
    I’ll give you something to tear your *** in two.
    What better way to show a woman who’s in charge than violent, non-consensual sodomy?

    Ultimately, Robin Thicke’s rape anthem is about male desire and male dominance over a woman’s personal sexual agency. The rigid definition of masculinity makes the man unable to accept the idea that sometimes his advances are not welcome. Thus, instead of treating a woman like a human being and respecting her subjectivity, she’s relegated to the role of living sex doll whose existence is naught but for the pleasure of a man.

    In Melinda Hugh’s Lame Lines parody of Thicke’s song she sings, “You think I want it/ I really don’t want it/ Please get off it.” The Law Revue Girls “Defined Lines” response to Blurred Lines notes, “Yeah we don’t want it/ It’s chauvinistic/ You’re such a bigot.” Rosalind Peters says in her one-woman retort, “Let’s clear up something mate/ I’m here to have fun/ I’m not here to get raped.”
    There are no “blurred lines.” There is only one line: consent.
    And the absence of consent is a crime.
    Sezin Koehler is an informal ethnographer and novelist living in Florida. You can find her on Twitter and Facebook.
    Out of Many One People Online
    http://www.jamaicans.com

  • #2
    Everytime this song comes on I turn it up. And sing along. Yeah, the lyrics are a little risque in parts, but I don't read so much into it.

    I don't believe they wrote the song as an anthem for rapists, so geez, people need to give up and move on. I have de feeling dat is de ooman tittie dem eena de uncensored vid dat badda moas a dem...

    As for The Law Revue's parody: meh. I think I heard it somewhere where they say that they were doing a feminist response to the obvious misogyny of Blurred Lines. After seeing their video, I came away thinking it was more an exercise in misandry.

    But I could be wrong, though, as I really haven't listened to the lyrics...
    Every obstacle is an opportunity in disguise.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've heard much much worse....like "bend over ___ and _____ that ______" kinda thing.

      I not sure why them tek set on this song. I guess because it's popular. I sing along to this song too and do a one step dance ting if I on the treadmill. To me it's like a playful, flirtatious kind of song. But I guess people hear what they hear based on their experiences.
      “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about.”

      Comment


      • #4
        ^^^

        Comment


        • #5
          Some of the lyrics today are very deceiving. I know some of it is playful but there is research that they do when writing songs. My father is a singer and songwriter from back in the day in Jamaica. He does research when writing lyrics. I have been around other musicians and it is the same thing. They know exactly hat they are doing when they write the lyrics...they all say the rhythm or the hook must be catch and people will over look the risky lyrics...
          Out of Many One People Online
          http://www.jamaicans.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Xavier View Post
            Some of the lyrics today are very deceiving. I know some of it is playful but there is research that they do when writing songs. My father is a singer and songwriter from back in the day in Jamaica. He does research when writing lyrics. I have been around other musicians and it is the same thing. They know exactly hat they are doing when they write the lyrics...they all say the rhythm or the hook must be catch and people will over look the risky lyrics...

            very true! Calypso was known for its double entendres, and a few summers ago 'Pumped Out Kicks'? story about a kid who was thinking of mass killing, outrun my gun & dem ting deh

            but the hook, gets people every time.
            If you don't fight for what you deserve, you deserve what you get.
            We are > Fossil Fuels --- Bill McKibben 350.org

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Xavier View Post
              Some of the lyrics today are very deceiving. I know some of it is playful but there is research that they do when writing songs. My father is a singer and songwriter from back in the day in Jamaica. He does research when writing lyrics. I have been around other musicians and it is the same thing. They know exactly hat they are doing when they write the lyrics...they all say the rhythm or the hook must be catch and people will over look the risky lyrics...

              didnt wanna go there but ive heard this too especially when it come to those umm *ahem* illuminati *cough* artists that want to send a message when the song is played backwards

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't have strong feelings about the song. I like the beat and while I don't have a problem with it, I get that it could be a trigger for someone who has been sexually assaulted. However, my point is that I've heard lyrics of other songs that are far more explicit and "rapey".
                Last edited by CeaBee; 09-27-2013, 04:39 PM.
                “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about.”

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by CeaBee View Post
                  I don't have strong feelings about the song. I like the beat and while I don't have a problem with it, I get that it could be a trigger for someone who has been sexually assaulted. However my point is that I've heard lyrics of other songs that far more explicit and "rapey".
                  This! The repeating chorus could really echo a rapist's jeer and send a survivor back to a darker event
                  ~~~~People often say that motivation doesn't last. Well, neither does bathing. That's why we recommend it daily. Zig Ziglar ~~~~

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    never heard the song, but having read this i nowwant to be taken savagely - like not in a dark alley after being bashed in the head and left for dead or anything - but you get the idea.
                    When Miley Cyrus gets naked and licks a hammer it's *art* and *music* - when I do it I'm *wasted* and *have to leave the hardware store*.

                    Comment

                    Welcome to vBulletin!

                    Collapse

                    Welcome to your vBulletin forum! You can click "Edit Site" above for site administration options.

                    ads

                    Collapse

                    Latest Topics

                    Collapse

                    Trending

                    Collapse

                    There are no results that meet this criteria.

                    Working...
                    X