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Doctor helping cancer patients.

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  • Doctor helping cancer patients.

    A medical resident at Mayo Clinic is helping patients online by answering their questions at his website. His work is voluntary/free, and he is asking the online community to help spread the word by blogging and/or linking to his website.

    Click here to get more Information:

    Also here:
    JA.com member #946 for LIFE!

  • #2
    Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

    That's good, some ppl could utilize the online help
    Life is full of changes

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

      The Kanzius Machine: A Cancer Cure?

      April 13, 2008(CBS) What if we told you that a guy with no background in science or medicine-not even a college degree-has come up with what may be one of the most promising breakthroughs in cancer research in years?

      Well it's true, and if you think it sounds improbable, consider this: he did it with his wife's pie pans and hot dogs.

      His name is John Kanzius, and he's a former businessman and radio technician who built a radio wave machine that has cancer researchers so enthusiastic about its potential they're pouring money and effort into testing it out.

      Here's the important part: if clinical trials pan out-and there's still a long way to go-the Kanzius machine will zap cancer cells all through your body without the need for drugs or surgery and without side effects. None at all. At least that's the idea.


      The last thing John Kanzius thought he'd ever do was try to cure cancer. A former radio and television executive from Pennsylvania, he came to Florida to enjoy his retirement.

      "I have no business being in the cancer business. It’s not something that a layman like me should be in, it should be left to doctors and research people," he told correspondent Lesley Stahl.

      "But sometimes it takes an outsider," Stahl remarked.

      "Sometimes it just - maybe you get lucky," Kanzius replied.

      It was the worst kind of luck that gave Kanzius the idea to use radio waves to kill cancer cells: six years ago, he was diagnosed with terminal leukemia and since then has undergone 36 rounds of toxic chemotherapy. But it wasn't his own condition that motivated him, it was looking into the hollow eyes of sick children on the cancer ward at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

      "I saw the smiles of youth and saw their spirits were broken. And you could see that they were sort of asking, 'Why can't they do something for me?'" Kanzius told Stahl.

      "So they started to haunt you. The children," Stahl asked.
      "Their faces. I still remember them holding on their Teddy bears and so forth," he replied. "And shortly after that I started my own chemotherapy, my third round of chemotherapy."

      Kanzius told Stahl the chemotherapy made him very sick and that he couldn't sleep at night. "And I said, 'There’s gotta be a better way to treat cancer.'"

      It was during one of those sleepless nights that the light bulb went off. When he was young, Kanzius was one of those kids who built radios from scratch, so he knew the hidden power of radio waves. Sick from chemo, he got out of bed, went to the kitchen, and started to build a radio wave machine.

      "Started looking in the cupboard and I saw pie pans and I said, 'These are perfect. I can modify these,'" he recalled.

      His wife Marianne woke up that night to a lot of banging and clamoring. "I was concerned truthfully that he had lost it," she told Stahl.

      "She felt sorry for me," Kanzius added.

      "I did," Marianne Kanzius acknowledged. "And I had mentioned to him, 'Honey, the doctors can't-you know, find an answer to cancer. How can you think that you can?'"

      That's what 60 Minutes wanted to know, so Stahl went to his garage laboratory to find out.

      Here's how it works: one box sends radio waves over to the other, creating enough energy to activate gas in a fluorescent light. Kanzius put his hand in the field to demonstrate that radio waves are harmless to humans.

      "So right from the beginning you're trying to show that radio waves could activate gas and not harm the human-anything else," Stahl remarked. "'Cause you're looking for some kind of a treatment with no side effects, that's what's in your head."

      "No side effects," Kanzius replied.

      But how could he focus the radio waves to destroy cancer cells?

      "That was the next $64,000 question," Kanzius said.

      The answer would cost much more than that. Kanzius spent about $200,000 just to have a more advanced version of his machine built. He knew that metal heats up when it's exposed to high-powered radio waves. So what if a tumor was injected with some kind of metal, and zapped with a focused beam of radio waves? Would the metal heat up and kill the cancer cells, but leave the area around them unharmed? He did his first test with hot dogs.

      "I'm going to inject it with some copper sulfate," Kanzius explained, demonstrating the machine. "And I’m going to take the probe right at the injection site."

      Kanzius placed the hot dog in his radio wave machine, and Stahl watched to see if the temperature would rise in that one area where the metal solution was and nowhere else.

      "And when I saw it start to go up I said, 'Eureka, I've done it,'" Kanzius remembered. "And I said, 'God, I gotta shut this off and see whether it's still cold down below.' So I shut it off, took my probe, went down here where it wasn’t injected. And the temperature dropped back down. And I said, 'God, maybe I got something here.'"

      Kanzius thought he had found a way attack cancer cells without the collateral damage caused by chemotherapy and radiation. Today, his invention is in the laboratories of two major research centers - the University of Pittsburgh and M.D. Anderson, where Dr. Steven Curley, a liver cancer surgeon, is testing it.

      "This technology may allow us to treat just about any kind of cancer you can imagine," Dr. Curley told Stahl. "I've gotta tell you, in 20 years of research this is the most exciting thing that I’ve encountered."

      That's because Kanzius impressed Curley with another remarkable idea: to combine the radio waves from his device with something cutting edge - space age nanoparticles made of metal or carbon. They are so small that thousands of them can fit in a single cancer cell. Because they’re metallic, Kanzius was hoping his radio waves would them heat up and kill the cancer.

      "If these nanoparticles work then we truly have something huge here," Kanzius told Stahl.

      Enter Rick Smalley, another cancer patient at M.D. Anderson and the man who won the Nobel Prize for discovering nanoparticles made from carbon. As luck would have it, Dr. Curley was called in one day to examine Smalley. Before leaving, he asked him for some of his nanoparticles.

      "I proceeded to tell him what I wanted to do and that I thought they would heat. He looked at me with sort of a studied long look and didn’t say anything. And then he looked at me and said, 'It won’t work,'" Curley remembered. "And just laughed and said, 'Well, look, I'll give you some. But don't be too disappointed.'"

      So Dr. Curley brought a vial of those precious nanoparticles to John Kanzius.

      And on an August day in 2005, Curley and Kanzius put them to the test. Would the metallic nanoparticles heat up enough to kill cancer?

      "So we take the nanoparticles, we put 'em in the radio field. And in about 15 seconds, they’re boiling and heating and Steve Curley couldn't contain himself. He called Rick Smalley and he said, 'Rick, you’re not going to believe this. He just blew the smithereens out of your nanoparticles,'" Kanzius recalled.

      Smalley's response? "The only thing that I got out of him after this pause was, “Holy s…,'" Curley recalled.

      Not long after that day, Smalley died of lymphoma. Once a skeptic, he had become one of Kanzius' biggest supporters.

      "He didn’t expect it, but he embraced it to his death bed when he told Dr. Curley this will change medicine forever. Don't stop, no matter what you do," Kanzius told Stahl.

      And they haven't stopped. They’ve already shown that the Kanzius machine can heat nanoparticles and cook cancer to death in animals. Dr. Curley with rabbits, and in Pittsburgh, Dr. David Geller demonstrated to 60 Minutes how he used nanoparticles, made from gold, to kill liver cancer cells grown in rats.

      "Now what we’re going to do is inject the nanoparticles," Dr. Geller explained. "Directly into the tumor."

      In the study the rats, anesthetized to keep them still, were exposed to the Kanzius radio waves. Dr. Geller later examined their tumors under a microscope.

      "What you can see is that cells are starting to fall apart. You see white spaces in between them. The body of the cell is shrinking, the cells are starting to die," Geller pointed out.

      "And can you tell from this whether the area surrounding the tumor had any destruction?" Stahl asked.

      "Grossly inspecting the animal, we did not see not see any damage to the surrounding tissue," Geller said.

      So far, the Kanzius method has only been applied to solid, localized tumors in animals. The ultimate goal is to treat cancer that has metastasized or spread to other parts of the body. Those undetectable rogue cells are what most often kill people with cancer and the trick is finding them.

      "If we can't target the microscopic cells this is not going to be a cure," Curley said.

      That’s why Curley is trying to use special molecules that are programmed to target cancer cells and attach nanoparticles to them.

      He showed Stahl an animation of how he hopes the targeting will work in people one day, with a simple injection of gold nanoparticles into the bloodstream.

      "What we’re seeing here is an example of a gold nanoparticle in this case with an antibody on it, so the antibody would be the targeting molecule," Curley explained. "You can see it is tiny compared to a normal red blood cell just imagine all of these billions of these gold nanoparticles circulating through the body and then once they get into the blood vessels going to the tumor, these nanoparticles would go through and bind on the surface of the cell."

      "The cancer cell. It wouldn't bind on a normal cell," Stahl observed.

      "That's right, they would bind only to the cancer cell. Now here’s the nanoparticles in the cell, here comes John's radio frequency treatment. The cells get hot and they’re destroyed," Curley said.

      "Gosh, it does look like one of those science fiction movies," Stahl remarked.

      "Right now it is a little science fiction," Curley agreed. "We’re not quite to the real time yet, but it’s got a lot of promise."

      Even if all goes well in the lab, it'll be at least another four years before human trials can start. But John Kanzius says he's afraid he doesn't have that much time. So to help speed up the research, he's been raising millions of dollars and getting press coverage about his invention.

      "Now I can't count the number of times the journalistic community, has done stories on a cancer cure," Stahl said. "I did one in 1973. …How many times have we seen these things work in the Petri dish, work with animals. And then you get them into humans and they don’t work."

      "Dozens," Curley replied.

      But if this one does work, it most likely won't be developed in time to help the man who invented it. John Kanzius may have the option of a bone marrow transplant that could buy him more time, but after six years of chemo it would be another grueling ordeal.

      "Did you ever say, 'I’m not going to do this anymore. I’m not going to put myself through it,'?" Stahl asked.

      "Yes. I said that-only about a year and a half ago," Kanzius replied. "I changed my mind because I think with all the research that’s going on with the institutions, that maybe, I'd like to be around for the first patient to get treated and just have a smile."

      "Oh my God," Stahl said.

      "And then I don't care anymore," Kanzius replied.

      Source - 60 Minutes.

      http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/i_vi...ml?id=4006247n
      JA.com member #946 for LIFE!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

        Well!! So he is trying to develope a longer wave radiation spectrum.
        Radiography is already used as a treatment for cancers, but cannot completely remove it.
        Curing cancer is not a matter of excising the active tumers. It is about reversing the pathology that causes normal cells to become cancer cells.
        The act of removing every cancerous cell is not a cure. It is aprocess of reducing the stage of the cancer.
        Cancer is the result of the breakdown of the process of orderly cell replacement. Every single cell in the body is replaced at least once every 9 months.
        While one is geowing bigger, cells each cell is replaced by 2 cells.
        After we have completed the growing process, each cell ais replaced by one cell or in cases of an injury new cells are added as is necessary to fill the void created by the lost cells.
        There are mechanisms that regulate these replacements.

        Cancer is usually the result of breakdown in the mechanism, that sences the presence of existing cells, of the mecahnism that changes from the growth stage to the replacement stage of life.

        The heavy use of NSAIDS is found to be a conbtributoe in both cases. Snice the mechanism of NSAIDs shuts foen the cells abillity to sense pain.
        Well it also over time affect the cells abillity to sense the presemce of cells amd initiate the process of over profuction of cells to replace cells that are in place, but are not being recognized due to the reduced abillity of cells to sense their presence.
        The whole idea of using NSAIDs is really flawed any way.
        Since pain is usually a sign of some other injury. Any act of just ridding the body of the pain without diagnosing and treating the cause of the pain is flawed.
        That of course is another topic.
        Join me as members of the church of LOVE,and let us change the world, one good deed at a time.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

          Hey JKid
          Betty and I are in shock at the news from Jeff of Cindy's passing from cancer. I just seen it on the MiYard board and thought I'd make sure you knew.
          They were a great couple and they'll be missed.
          RIP Cindy
          You can make Someones Day in Jamaica...help a kid (pickney)

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

            Not Cancer but I thought this would be good here as well:

            <a href="http://www.publicradio.org/columns/futuretense/2009/01/a-visit-to-the.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">
            <span style="font-style: italic">January 14, 2009</span>
            <span style="font-family: 'Arial Black'">A visit to the doctor via Webcam</span></a>

            <span style="font-family: 'Courier New'">Every resident of Hawaii now has the option of going online to visit with a physician.

            There's almost no waiting for a two-way Webcam appointment or text chat. The 700,000 members of the Hawaii Medical Service Association, the state's Blue Cross Blue Shield insurance provider, pay $10 for such a visit. But anyone - insured or not - can see an online doc for $45.</span>
            <span style="font-weight: bold">0ok</span>

            <span style="font-style: italic">&quot;What good fortune for those in power that people do not think&quot;</span>
            - <span style="font-weight: bold">Adolf Hitler</span>, as quoted by Joachim Fest.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

              Tuff, will they check the patients vitals (BP, temp, etc) long distance?

              I know it is very possible to do.
              JA.com member #946 for LIFE!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

                <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: J kid</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Tuff, will they check the patients vitals (BP, temp, etc) long distance?

                I know it is very possible to do. </div></div>
                The article didn't say, I would have to see if more details come out!
                <span style="font-weight: bold">0ok</span>

                <span style="font-style: italic">&quot;What good fortune for those in power that people do not think&quot;</span>
                - <span style="font-weight: bold">Adolf Hitler</span>, as quoted by Joachim Fest.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

                  <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Tuff Gong</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Not Cancer but I thought this would be good here as well:

                  <a href="http://www.publicradio.org/columns/futuretense/2009/01/a-visit-to-the.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">
                  <span style="font-style: italic">January 14, 2009</span>
                  <span style="font-family: 'Arial Black'">A visit to the doctor via Webcam</span></a>

                  <span style="font-family: 'Courier New'">Every resident of Hawaii now has the option of going online to visit with a physician.

                  There's almost no waiting for a two-way Webcam appointment or text chat. The 700,000 members of the Hawaii Medical Service Association, the state's Blue Cross Blue Shield insurance provider, pay $10 for such a visit. But anyone - insured or not - can see an online doc for $45.</span> </div></div>The technology has really been in use in specializaruins like cardiologt. and they can do all those checks and more.
                  They rutinely adjust cardiac pacemakers by that strategy also.

                  If you Google 'telemetrty in medicine' you may be abe to fund info on it.
                  I was involved in one proto program involving an island in Maine.
                  That was 10 years ago and it worked well in the winter, but that was a small scale program.
                  and yes they involve vitals like Blood Pressure, temp, respiratoty, and heart rate check etc.
                  Join me as members of the church of LOVE,and let us change the world, one good deed at a time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.


                    The company offering is out of Boston and it will cost $10 Co-Pay and 40+ for non-insured. They plan to expand the service to other States after the initial roll out.
                    <span style="font-weight: bold">0ok</span>

                    <span style="font-style: italic">&quot;What good fortune for those in power that people do not think&quot;</span>
                    - <span style="font-weight: bold">Adolf Hitler</span>, as quoted by Joachim Fest.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

                      Bee venom destroys cancer cells in tests on mice:

                      Bee venom can be engineered to target tumours and could prove an effective future treatment for cancer, a study has found.

                      During a trial, the poisonous chemical in a bee’s sting, melittin, was attached to tiny molecules or “nanoparticles” that then attack and destroy cancer cells, leaving healthy cells intact. The carrier particles, dubbed “nanobees”, were also effective in targeting pre-cancerous cells.

                      Source

                      Nanobees could eventually replace conventional therapy for certain types of cancer, according to scientists behind the study, which is published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. They said that the treatment would have fewer side-effects than chemotherapy.

                      “The nanobees fly in, land on the surface of cells and deposit their poisonous cargo,” said Professor Samuel Wickline, a specialist in nanomedicine at Washington University in St Louis, who led the research.

                      The treatment was tested on two groups of mice with cancerous tumours. One group had melanoma skin cancer, the other had been implanted with human breast-cancer cells. After four to five injections of the nanobees, the breast-cancer tumours were 25 per cent smaller, and the melanoma tumours were 88 per cent smaller, compared with untreated mice.

                      The carrier particles used in the study have already been approved for clinical use in various other medical applications. The team plans to begin human trials with the nanobees next year.

                      They predict that the treatment could be effective in treating a wide range of cancers and that it would have fewer side-effects than chemotherapy. They say the treatment could also be more effective than chemotherapy, because it is more targeted. With chemotherapy, patients are given the largest tolerable dose of medication, but because nanobees specifically attack tumours, doses could be much lower.

                      Melittin works by attaching itself to the surface of cells and ripping holes in the membrane. “In high enough concentration it can destroy any cell it comes into contact with,” said Professor Paul Schlesinger, a cell biologist at Washington University and a co-author of the paper.

                      Most cancer treatments target DNA, but cancer cells are frequently able to adapt and develop resistance to DNA damage. It is much harder for cells to defend against damage to the membrane, however, making melittin an attractive treatment.

                      Despite the high toxicity of the bee venom, the mice suffered few side-effects and there appeared to be little damage to non-cancerous cells.

                      Leaky blood vessels around tumours mean that nanoparticles build up there in high enough quantities to do damage. A chemical tag enhanced this effect by increasing nanobees’ affinity for cancerous cells compared with normal cells.

                      “It’s like molecular Velcro,” Professor Wickline said. “The toxin doesn’t come off the bee until it finds its target.”

                      If the melittin had been injected into the bloodstream in its normal form it would lead to widespread destruction of red blood cells. But following the nanobee injection, the blood count of mice was normal, and they showed no signs of organ damage.

                      A concern with some nanomedicines is that nanoparticles are left circulating in the body after treatment. They are biologically inert, meaning they are do not get metabolised and cleared from circulation in the normal way.

                      The spherical nanobees, which are about six millionths of an inch in diameter, are, however, quickly cleared from the system after treatment. They are made of perfluorocarbon, an inert non-toxic compound used in artificial blood. Once the melittin has been removed from the nanobee, it dissolves and is evaporated in the lungs.
                      JA.com member #946 for LIFE!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

                        I think the nano particles of gold are what kills the cancer cells by suffocating them when they attach so they can't reproduce. It works the same way as silver nano particles -ie. &quot;colloidal silver&quot; does. Not sure why he feels he needs to heat the stuff up with radio waves. Plus silver is a better conductor and way cheaper than gold.
                        Don't eat the yellow snow !

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

                          Thanks for the article on the Kanzius machine, JKid.
                          Yeah, but i didn't know what i didn't know.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

                            Gold is a better medium because in the environment silver will oxidize and reduce it's conductivity.

                            gold will not, and as a result maintain optimum conductivity. .

                            Cancer is not really a thing it is metabolic activity.
                            what is called cancer cells are areally cells that have been affected by cancer.
                            you can't cure cancer by eliminating the cells.
                            since the metabolic activity that originated the effect on
                            the cells will not be reversed, by the absence of cells it has affected.
                            It Has the ability to simply act on new group of cells . what popular cancer treatment attempt to do is to try and keep ahead of the metabolic activity of cancer.
                            that is to remove cells that has been damaged by cancer. they do not deal with the underlying cause that resulted in the metabolic activity that is behind cancer.

                            cancer is a metabolic disease.

                            it will be eradicated when those who profit from medicine decide to treat it as such.
                            That is it becomes more profitable to do so.

                            instead of something to cut out. or to drug, or irradiate to death. because thi sapproach is more profitable at present.<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: J RockTodd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I think the nanoparticles of gold are what kills the cancer cells by suffocating them when they attach so they can't reproduce. It works the same way as silver nanoparticles -in. &quot;colloidal silver&quot; does. Not sure why he feels he needs to heat the stuff up with radio waves. Plus silver is a better conductor and way cheaper than gold. </div></div>
                            Join me as members of the church of LOVE,and let us change the world, one good deed at a time.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Doctor helping cancer patients.

                              ther is alot that can be done about changing the nature of a cell without actually killing it.
                              Join me as members of the church of LOVE,and let us change the world, one good deed at a time.

                              Comment

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